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  • Registration is open every day from 7:30 a.m. until the close of the day’s sessions. 
  • 30-minute refreshment breaks are at 10:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. daily (Wednesday afternoon break is at 2:00 p.m.). 
  • Lunch is 12:00-1:00 p.m. daily in the Catalina Ballroom (Monday lunch is in the Shutters Hospitality Suite)
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Monday, May 2
 

8:30am

Designing Modern SOA Systems

In 15 years, service-oriented architecture (SOA) has gone from a buzzword to an established technology. But new patterns, frameworks, and standards continue to emerge in the SOA space. In this recently developed course, we will focus on design decisions and tradeoffs that SOA architects face today. Topics that will be covered include REST constraints and good practices; SOA solutions that include event-driven messaging, API gateways, and orchestration platforms; and microservices vs. monoliths, security, alternatives for integration to external systems, and other design considerations for SOA solutions.


Presenters
avatar for Paulo Merson

Paulo Merson

Software Architect, Brazilian Federal Court of Accounts (TCU)
Software Architecture in general, but in particular SOA, microservices, architecture enforcement, and architecture documentation.


Monday May 2, 2016 8:30am - 4:30pm
Fairbanks B

8:30am

DevOps and Continuous Delivery: Practices, Architecture, and Security

This course is targeted at architects designing software-intensive systems with a goal of adopting DevOps practices to enable continuous delivery of high quality and secure software. If you know nothing about DevOps, don’t fear. The course begins with a brief overview of DevOps and key concepts. If you attended last year, consider coming again since roughly half of the material is new. In addition to examples of designing for deployability from real projects, we have added deep dives and case studies that focus on variability options and the pros and cons of popular DevOps architectural patterns such as microservices, feature toggling, canary testing, and image baking. We also explore more deeply how to integrate static analysis tools into the deployment pipeline to minimize architectural drift and provide tips for how to get the best value from them. Practical takeaways include a template for specifying measurable deployability requirements and a handout with more than 20 architectural tactics successfully used on DevOps projects. To keep things interesting, we also include a facilitated discussion session on the role of the architect and Infrastructure as Code.


Instructors
avatar for Stephany Bellomo

Stephany Bellomo

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Stephany Bellomo is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI). She teaches SEI courses in Service-Oriented Architecture Migration of Legacy Components and Software Architecture Principles and Practices. Bellomo is a member of the organizing committee for the International Workshop on Release Engineering 2014, hosted by Google, and a member of the editorial committee for an issue of... Read More →
avatar for Rick Kazman

Rick Kazman

University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Rick Kazman is a Professor at the University of Hawaii and a Research Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute. His primary research interests are software architecture, design and analysis tools, software visualization, and software engineering economics. He is the author of over 150 papers and co-author of several books, including Software Architecture in Practice and Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies. Kazman... Read More →

Monday May 2, 2016 8:30am - 4:30pm
Fairbanks C

8:30am

Managing Technical Debt for Software

Technical debt occurs when a design or construction approach is taken that’s expedient in the short term but that increases complexity and cost in the long term. Whether it results from ignorance, accident, or strategy, all software-reliant systems carry some technical debt. If managed well, some technical debt can accelerate design exploration. Left unrecognized and unmanaged, accumulated technical debt results in increased development and sustainment costs. This course is designed for professionals who develop and maintain software-reliant systems to gain a better understanding of

  • how technical debt manifests in software
  • what developers, architects, and managers need to know about technical debt
  • how to manage technical debt effectively

This one-day course emphasizes the importance of intentional and strategic management of technical debt that is supported by architecture-focused practices.


Instructors
avatar for Rod Nord

Rod Nord

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Robert Nord is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the SEI, where he develops effective methods and practices for software architecture. He also leads research on strategies for scaling agile development by incorporating architecture practices. Before joining the SEI, he worked in industry, where he balanced research in software architecture with work in designing and evaluating large-scale systems. He earned a PhD in computer... Read More →
avatar for Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Ipek Ozkaya is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the SEI and deputy lead of the Architecture Practices Initiative. She develops effective methods for improving software development and system evolution by emphasizing software architecture practices, software economics, and agile development. Her recent research focuses on managing technical debt in large-scale, software-intensive systems. Ozkaya serves as chair of the advisory board... Read More →

Monday May 2, 2016 8:30am - 4:30pm
Fairbanks D

5:30pm

6:30pm

Software Architecture Boot Camp: Architecture 101

The right architecture can make or break a project, or an entire company. Participants will learn what architects do, why it is important, and some tips on how to talk about architecture with stakeholders. We'll start with some definitions and case study examples of how architecture supports business goals. We'll dig into how an architecture's separation of concerns helps us deal with complexity. We'll look at some rules of thumb for creating good architectures and how to incorporate architecture into agile projects, and finish up with a map of architecture-centric processes.


Instructors
avatar for John Klein

John Klein

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
John Klein has over 20 years’ experience developing systems and software. He joined the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in 2008, where he is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff. Before joining the SEI, John was a chief architect at Avaya, Inc., where his responsibilities included developing multimodal agents, architectures for communication analytics, and the Customer Interaction Software Product Line... Read More →

Monday May 2, 2016 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Fairbanks C
 
Tuesday, May 3
 

8:30am

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Presenters
avatar for Amine Chigani

Amine Chigani

GE Digital
Amine Chigani is a Principal Architect at GE Digital. His work focuses on building Industrial IoT solutions on the Predix™ Platform for GE businesses and their customers. He’s equally passionate about the software he builds and about how architecture is employed in building such software across the organization. Amine is a founding member and contributor in the Industrial Internet Consortium’s technology working group. Prior... Read More →
avatar for Bill Pollak

Bill Pollak

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Leading Advisor, Statoil ASA
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong beliefs in open source and internet technology. Currently he holds the position of leading advisor in corporate IT at Statoil, focusing on the subsurface application portfolio and systems integration challenges. He holds an MSc in Computer Science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).


Tuesday May 3, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom

9:00am

Keynote: Architecting the Unknown

There are many systems that we know how to architect (usually because we've built them many times before). There also many systems for which we know a process that will lead us to a reasonable architecture (usually because the forces on our project permit incremental and iterative development). There are even some things we know how not to architect (because we've tried before). However, there are some systems for which we hardly know where to begin (because not only are they wickedly hard, they are also far beyond our current art and science). These are the classes of systems that most interest me: how do we architect the unknown? In this presentation, we'll start by laying a foundation of what we know we know about software architecture, and then we'll consider what we know we don't know. Following that, we'll take a leap into the unknown and look at the kinds of systems that will stretch us both technically, socially, and ethically.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.

See an artist's rendering.


Presenters
avatar for Grady Booch

Grady Booch

IBM Research
Grady Booch is Chief Scientist for Software Engineering as well as Chief Scientist for Watson/M at IBM Research. Having originated the term and the practice of object-oriented design, he is best known for his work in advancing the fields of software engineering and software architecture. A co-author of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), a founding member of the Agile Alliance, and a founding member of the Hillside Group, Grady has published six... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom

10:30am

Software Architecture Boot Camp: Architecture 101

The right architecture can make or break a project, or an entire company. Participants will learn what architects do and why it is important and some tips on how to talk about architecture with stakeholders. We'll start with some definitions and case study examples of how architecture supports business goals. Then we'll dig into how an architecture's separation of concerns helps us deal with complexity. Next, we'll look at some rules of thumb for creating good architectures and how to incorporate architecture into agile projects. Finally, we'll finish up with a map of architecture-centric processes.


Instructors
avatar for John Klein

John Klein

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
John Klein has over 20 years’ experience developing systems and software. He joined the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in 2008, where he is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff. Before joining the SEI, John was a chief architect at Avaya, Inc., where his responsibilities included developing multimodal agents, architectures for communication analytics, and the Customer Interaction Software Product Line... Read More →

Tuesday May 3, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks D

10:30am

Architecture-Led Pedagogical Artifacts as a Unifying Theme

The Architecture Practices Initiative of the SEI has developed a family of domain-specific languages for system specification and verification and validation (V&V) to work in concert with the Architecture Analysis & Design Language (AADL). These languages provide support for exploring architecture’s influence in all phases of the traditional software lifecycle. Additional tools—including AGREE, Resolute, and the plugins of the Open Source AADL Tool Environment (OSATE)—supplement the domain-specific languages to provide both static and dynamic V&V capabilities. These tools establish feedback loops between requirements and architecture and between architecture and implementation, all of which are unified with V&V activities.

In this session, attendees will see a set of pedagogical artifacts that illustrates the use of architecture information to support multiple graduate courses. All of the artifacts have been successfully used. With the ReqSpec language, requirements are explicitly linked to the development stakeholders and initial architecture information. The requirements information is linked to verification assets using the Verify language and to certification assets using the Assure language for assurance cases. A brief set of exercises will illustrate some uses of the artifacts both in instruction and development.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for John D. McGregor

John D. McGregor

Clemson University
Dr. John D. McGregor is an associate professor of computer science at Clemson University, a Software Architecture Researcher at the Software Engineering Institute, and a partner in Luminary Software, a software/systems engineering consulting firm. His research interests include highly reliable software-intensive systems, software product lines, sociotechnical ecosystems, model-driven development, and software/system architecture. He has chaired... Read More →
avatar for Roselane Silva

Roselane Silva

Federal University of Bahia
Roselane Sylva is a student researcher at Clemson University and at the Federal University of Bahia in Salvador, Brazil. She has studied in both Brazil and the United States and focuses on software architecture.


Tuesday May 3, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks B

10:30am

Evolutionary Architecture
Evolutionary architecture and emergent design are two approaches to designing software in an agile manner. In this talk, we will explore what qualifies as evolutionary architecture, the concrete practices that architects use to build evolvable systems, and the surrounding conditions that make building evolutionary architectures easier.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.

Presenters
avatar for Patrick Kua

Patrick Kua

Technical Principal Consultant, ThoughtWorks
Patrick Kua is a Principal Technical Consultant for ThoughtWorks in London, and is the author of two books, The Retrospective Handbook and Talking with Tech Leads. Patrick is a frequent conference speaker and blogger who is passionate about bringing a balanced focused between people, organisations and technology.


Tuesday May 3, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks C

10:30am

IoT in Statoil: Present and Future

Statoil is a large upstream oil and gas company with many physical installations both onshore and offshore. All of these installations, and the logistics operations that support them, use an increasing number of interconnected devices with varying degrees of capability and smartness to improve their operation. As an organization, we have many years of collected experience with the types of devices that are now being called the Internet of Things (IoT). We would like to share some of the trends, challenges, and opportunities that we see in this area and discuss its importance for the future of our installations and the software that is required to utilize their full potential.

We will present different aspects of what IoT means in the context of a large oil- and gas-producing company and how it affects the way we think about software and software architecture. We have worked with interconnected devices of different kinds for many years and have some thoughts on future challenges in this area that we would like to share with the SATURN community. We will organize the discussion around four main topics:

  • data quality
  • data storage and hosting
  • security
  • analytics

While we do not promise answers, we think that we can provide a perspective on these challenges from a large industry actor that can serve as a starting point for discussion on the path to some insights into how the IoT affects the way we think about software architecture.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Jarle Kallevik

Jarle Kallevik

Statoil ASA
Jarle Kallevik is an engineer and IT infrastructure architect currently working as leading advisor on the Internet of Things and Plant IT Infrastructure in Statoil. He has a special focus on how to consume IoT technology in the plant area. Jarle has a degree in engineering from the Norwegian College of Engineering and 23 years of experience in IT infrastructure, applications, and system integration.
avatar for Einar Landre

Einar Landre

Statoil
Einar Landre is a practicing software professional with almost 30 years of experience as a developer, consultant, and leader. He holds the position as leader of Statoil’s value-chain IT unit that is responsible for the products and services used to support Statoil’s well construction process. He has contributed to two software-related books and presented papers and work at international conferences such as OOPSLA, SPE Intelligent... Read More →
avatar for Harald Wesenberg

Harald Wesenberg

Statoil ASA
Harald Wesenberg is a Solution Architect with more than 15 years’ experience developing solutions for large oil and gas companies. He spends most of his time working in research projects addressing key technological challenges for Statoil. Prior to this, he worked as an Enterprise Architect for Statoil as well as a software developer, database administrator, and project manager. He has published numerous papers on software development and... Read More →
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Leading Advisor, Statoil ASA
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong beliefs in open source and internet technology. Currently he holds the position of leading advisor in corporate IT at Statoil, focusing on the subsurface application portfolio and systems integration challenges. He holds an MSc in Computer Science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).


Tuesday May 3, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks A

1:00pm

Architectural Refactoring

Let’s face it, the system you maintain isn’t meeting expectations. The crystal ball you were issued at engineer academy was broken, and you guessed wrong about how the system would grow. Now, you’re faced with a choice: should you bite the bullet and rewrite, or should you somehow try to salvage what you have? In this session, I will talk about the evolution of the system of applications at Pluralsight as we grew from 4 to 80 developers and from one to six technology stacks over a period of four years.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for David Adsit

David Adsit

Pluralsight
Since his first introduction to Apple II BASIC in the 4th grade, David Adsit enjoyed programming, but when he was introduced to TDD, his passion for code really ignited. Since then, he has worked to help build teams that build well-tested software. Though many developers prefer to work on green-field projects, David finds pleasure in helping a team rescue a ball of mud. As an active member of the local .NET, Ruby, and Software Craftsmanship... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Fairbanks B

1:00pm

Microservices Beyond the Hype

No doubt microservices are important, but it seems that all the hype around them comes with inflated expectations. Many consultants, authors, and vendors who provide services or products related to SOA have rebranded their material to mention microservices. But what is a microservice from a software-architecture perspective? What do you gain and what do you lose with microservices compared with the monolithic model? (Yes, there are disadvantages!)

In this talk, we’ll try to answer these questions and discuss some other important SOA patterns that can help achieve common SOA quality requirements.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Paulo Merson

Paulo Merson

Software Architect, Brazilian Federal Court of Accounts (TCU)
Software Architecture in general, but in particular SOA, microservices, architecture enforcement, and architecture documentation.


Tuesday May 3, 2016 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Fairbanks C

1:00pm

Software Architecture Boot Camp: Architecture Evaluation

Software architecture is critical for business success. Think about it. Solid architecture prevents defects and system failures. It saves money and gets quality products to the market faster. Most software-reliant systems are required to be modifiable and reliable. They may also need to be secure, interoperable, and portable. How do you know whether your software architecture is suitable or at risk relative to its target system qualities? This SEI boot camp session on Architecture Evaluation covers practical and proven architecture analysis and evaluation techniques that identify risks early in the life cycle, including scenario-driven peer reviews and the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM), a tested process that has been used in many evaluations over the past 15 years.


Instructors
avatar for Rod Nord

Rod Nord

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Dr. Robert Nord is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the SEI, where he develops effective methods and practices for software architecture. He also leads research on strategies for scaling agile development by incorporating architecture practices. Before joining the SEI, he worked in industry, where he balanced research in software architecture with work in designing and evaluating large-scale systems. He earned a PhD in computer... Read More →

Tuesday May 3, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks D

1:00pm

Cognitive IoT
IBM and its clients are ushering in a new cognitive era. The IBM Watson IoT platform extends the power of cognitive computing to the billions of connected devices, sensors, and systems that comprise the IoT. Why? Because IoT is testing the limits of programmable computing, and a Cognitive IoT platform is how we will overcome those limits. It is how we will accomplish the transformational outcomes we know are both possible and necessary—from operational efficiency to customer experience to industry disruption.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.

Presenters
avatar for Amit Fisher

Amit Fisher

IBM Watson
Amit Fisher is CTO of the IBM Watson IoT Engineering Solution. In this role, Amit pushes forward and promotes innovative IoT and Continuous Engineering solutions in the aerospace, defense, automotive, and electronic industries. He is a member of the IBM Industry Academy, the most prestigious IBM Industry forum. Prior to joining the IBM Software Group, Amit was a Senior Manager at IBM Research, Haifa, where he worked with select IBM clients in... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks A

1:30pm

12 Factor Apps: A Scorecard

Are you building applications that run in the cloud? Are you taking the necessary architecture steps to make them cloud-ready? In this session, I will present “12 Factor Apps: A Scorecard” to help you evaluate your application’s cloud-readiness. The content of this session stems from my hands-on experience at GE working with many teams to migrate legacy applications into our Predix cloud platform.

So you’ve decided to take your app to the cloud. Great! There are common pitfalls I would like to help you avoid. For example, pre-cloud applications may only be able to run on certain well-groomed servers (“pets”), but when deploying to the cloud, your application’s servers will be disposable (“cattle”). How can you properly refactor your application’s architecture to prepare for this new type of deployment environment?

The 12 Factor App is a methodology created by Adam Wiggins (co-founder of Heroku) to provide guidance for cloud application development. Through examples, I will use these 12 Factors to provide a ranking system for you to grade and identify ways to improve your application cloud-readiness. Attendees will be able to see how their applications stack up against the 12 Factors and will gain practical tips for improving their cloud-readiness.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Matt Momont

Matt Momont

GE Digital
Matt Momont is a newly minted Software Architect at GE Digital. He comes from a software development background that includes monitoring gas turbines, radiology imaging, and cloud platforms. His most recent work is on Predix.io, GE’s cloud platform. He holds a BS and MS in Computer Science from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, respectively. In his free time, he plays piano and races... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Fairbanks C

1:30pm

Frankensteining Software: Recycling Parts of Legacy Systems

Evolving the architecture of legacy systems for unintended use is difficult. The architectures are not documented well, the team that built the system has often moved on, old and out-of-date code is permanently intertwined, and the technology trends of the present are dramatically different from when the system was first developed. This is the situation our team found itself in while working to design a new cloud version of an existing product.

In this talk, we will share our story about evolving an enterprise search platform to create an isolated, portable crawler. The existing system has been in active development since the early 2000s and was initially designed for use in traditional data centers. Since then, it has evolved into a more pluggable product, able to connect to a variety of data sources. We wanted to recreate this functionality in the cloud, but we had a tight time constraint. We soon realized we might be able to migrate part of the previous code instead.

During this session, you will learn about modularity, using experiments to improve decision making and reduce risks, and how to analyze a legacy system to make well-grounded decisions for future design. We will demonstrate these lessons with examples from our experiences with this project.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.

Presenters
avatar for Joseph Kramer

Joseph Kramer

IBM
Joseph Kramer started in software development but recently transitioned to technical management within the IBM Watson group. He manages the Connectivity team for IBM Watson. As an engineer, he designs, architects, and implements multi-threaded, high-performance, scaling, fault-tolerant connectors between IBM Watson and other third-party repositories. In his spare time, he stays up to date on the latest technologies by reading blogs and books... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Manning

Jennifer Manning

IBM
Jennifer Manning is a Software Developer on the Connectivity team of IBM Watson Pittsburgh. She attended Michigan State University for undergraduate studies in computer science engineering and Japanese. Although newer to the Pittsburgh community, she has already become an organizer for two conferences and has integrated into the local software community. Always passionate about outreach, she has been involved with or organized for women in... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Fairbanks B

2:00pm

Architecting for Application Security

Ideally, the best application-security solutions would be built with security in mind from the ground up. To do this, you must start with a secure coding platform. Mainstream programming languages such as Java and C++ are inherently flawed with vulnerabilities derived from integer overflow and underflow, math errors from floating point floors and ceilings, and loss of information in type conversions. The languages we use were not designed for developing secure code.

The Secure Coding Framework (SCF) corrects these flaws and prevents developers from silently triggering errors that lead to cyber vulnerabilities. It also adds new features such as built-in range checking and exception handling to data types that enhance secure coding efforts. This presentation covers the development and use of the SCF as a secure coding platform. SCF makes it easy for developers to write secure code in mainstream programming languages. It supports the concept of building in security from the beginning rather than as an afterthought. Kertis will discuss the business drivers, software quality attributes, design and implementation, details of the APIs, and the patent-pending technology behind the product.


Presenters
avatar for Tim Kertis

Tim Kertis

Raytheon


Tuesday May 3, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks C

2:00pm

Code Review Is an Architectural Necessity

A wealth of material covers code review from a code quality standpoint, tracking a host of metrics and generating enough Big Data to employ a small army of analysts at some companies. But introducing code review at the architecture stage seems rarely to be done; it may even be sufficiently rare to qualify as novel. In this presentation, I will focus on some quality attributes valued by a team that conscientiously conducts code reviews, and how code review enables, but does not guarantee, these attributes in the team’s systems architecture: accountability, accuracy, auditability, debugability, efficiency, evolvability, failure transparency, inspectability, learnability, maintainability, manageability, modularity, predictability, repeatability, safety, serviceability, simplicity, standards compliance, testability, traceability, and understandability. I posit, based on my own meandering experience across several projects, both open and proprietary, that these quality attributes are enabled by code review and saved from being poorly timed afterthoughts or patches onto an architecture. To do so, I’ll analogize lawyers, debt collectors, and credit ratings.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Colin Dean

Colin Dean

Software Engineer, IBM
Scholar. Bon vivant. Champion of the oppressed.


Tuesday May 3, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks B

3:00pm

Growing Up with Globalization

For many developers, globalization is an afterthought. The unfortunate reality is that many of us have not considered it. It would have been nice to consider language as an abstraction from the beginning. Most mature frameworks have already considered and implemented tools to handle their wide variety of users, which should prompt us to do the same.

However, it isn’t always simple to flip this switch for the large projects that we work on today. Products need to have a methodology for storing and retrieving strings of parameterized text that does not rely on specific inflections, pluralization, or grammatical structures. We need to provide culturally accurate display formats of data types such as dates, numbers, and currency. Timestamp storage and retrieval needs to be standardized so time zones can display correctly. There are also concerns with languages, such as Hebrew and Arabic, that have bidirectional text that must be accounted for in user-interface elements. Our applications can provide sensible defaults based on regional data, but to deliver a globalized product, control of these abstractions needs to be exposed to the users of our applications. Finally, designing sound testing practices surrounding these abstractions is key to being able to rest peacefully once we have addressed all of these concerns.

During this presentation, I will walk through the experience of converting a Ruby on Rails web application that didn’t account for globalization needs at its inception, and I will use real code to illustrate how to best address these topics of globalization.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Andrew Turgeon

Andrew Turgeon

IBM
Andrew Turgeon is a web developer for the Watson Explorer team at IBM in Pittsburgh. He has worked in various web development roles for about four years; his most recent experience was with a web application based on Ruby on Rails. He attended Cornell University and graduated with a BS in Operations Research and Information Engineering in 2012. He has presented topics internally to smaller groups at his office about working with other web-related... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Fairbanks C

3:00pm

Model-Minded Development
  • Domain-Driven Design (DDD) says that we should be mindful of domain models and embed them in our code.
  • Design Patterns say that we should know a catalog of patterns so we can solve recurring problems that arise in object-oriented (OO) code.
  • Software Architecture says that unless we are mindful of large-scale patterns and models, then our systems will not achieve the qualities we seek.
  • Test-Driven Design (TDD) says that we should structure our code so that it can be more easily tested.
  • Programming styles (functional, OO, procedural, etc.) say what the core abstractions of our programs should be.

The common denominator here is that software developers are expected to keep in mind many abstract yet complex models that constrain the code they write. In some ways, these constraints are a burden, and in other ways, they are the light that illuminates a path forward.

I will discuss an idea called Model-Minded Development that generalizes across DDD, design patterns, architecture, TDD, and coding styles. The defining characteristic of senior software developers is their facility with Model-Minded Development, and it enables them to operate at an advanced level.

 

Get the slides.


Presenters
avatar for George Fairbanks

George Fairbanks

Google
George Fairbanks has been teaching software architecture and design since 1998, is the author of the book Just Enough Software Architecture, has a PhD in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and is a software engineer at Google.


Tuesday May 3, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Fairbanks B

3:00pm

Software Architecture and Design Practices for Industrial IoT

Industrial IoT is the next wave of technological revolution that will dramatically transform manufacturing, energy, health care, transportation, and other industrial sectors. This transformation will require new technologies that will connect data centers, industrial control systems, industrial machines, and humans. Connectivity and interoperability of heterogeneous systems are the foundations of Industrial IoT and major prerequisites to realize its full potential. There are too many proprietary industrial protocols and legacy standards that create interoperability and security challenges. These challenges cannot be resolved without a comprehensive approach to security and data privacy. Another big challenge is the amount of data generated by industrial devices and machines. It will be critical to build systems that can automate data collection, cleansing, and aggregation.

In this session, we will discuss GE’s experience for the last few years in building the Industrial Internet platform called Predix. We will focus on software architecture, design, and best practices in building secure and reliable systems to address the most important Industrial IoT challenges and use cases. We will discuss some of the important use cases and our architectural approaches to data acquisition, data processing, analytics, and security.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Alisher Maksumov

Alisher Maksumov

GE Digital
Alisher Maksumov is Principal Architect for Predix platform at GE Digital. He is responsible for the architecture, design, and roadmap of Predix. Since joining GE in 2012, he has played a key role in shaping the platform vision, technology stack, and engineering roadmap as well as working with internal GE businesses and third-party vendors on Industrial IoT solutions. Alisher has a broad experience in data science and analytics, software... Read More →
avatar for Michelangelo Russo

Michelangelo Russo

GE Digital
Michelangelo Russo is a Senior Staff Architect at GE Digital. He focuses on embedded and control systems, working with customers from diverse businesses—including energy, health care, lighting, and transportation—to enable solutions in the Industrial IoT space. He joined the team in San Ramon, CA, in 2014, from Florence, Italy, where he was a Senior Engineer in GE Oil & Gas, working on control systems for turbo-machinery... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Fairbanks A

3:00pm

Office Hours
Tuesday May 3, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Fairbanks D

3:30pm

Beyond REST

Writing APIs in a RESTful style is growing in popularity, but not all uses cases are good fits. Several interesting alternative technologies are emerging. This presentation provides overviews of the following alternatives styles:

  • Binary protocols are serialization mechanisms that demand neutral, platform-independent formats and allow data interchange over heterogeneous distributed systems. New sets of protocols support cross-language serialization.
  • Protocol buffers, developed by Google, are language- and platform-neutral, extensible mechanisms for serializing structured data.
  • Apache Thrift is an RPC framework as well as a binary communication protocol developed at Facebook and aiming at “scalable cross-language services development.”
  • Apache Avro is a language-neutral data serialization system.
  • Orchestration/Experience APIs shoot for the optimal user experience that is so important with the proliferation of user devices and phones. These user interfaces reduce network calls and provide an elegant way to query.
  • Falcor, created by Netflix, is a JavaScript library for efficient data fetching. Falcor powers Netflix’s mobile, desktop, and TV applications.
  • GraphQL is a query language created by Facebook. It provides flexible syntax for describing the capabilities and requirements of data models in a client–server interaction.
  • Asynchronous APIs provide alternatives to the traditional request/response pattern through asynchronous interactions.
  • Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) is an open-standard, application-layer protocol for message-oriented middleware.
  • Apache KAFKA was initially founded by LinkedIn and is a distributed publish–subscribe messaging system.

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Presenters
avatar for Yogeshwar Srikrishnan

Yogeshwar Srikrishnan

Rackspace
Yogeshwar Srikrishnan is a seasoned Enterprise Architect with significant experience in the design and delivery of business-critical solutions. He enjoys working with business and technical teams to solve business and technical challenges and specializes in service-oriented architecture and cloud computing. He has worked on assignments on three continents: America, Asia, and Europe. He currently works for Rackspace and has also worked for... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Fairbanks C

3:30pm

Flow Mapping: Visualizing User Stories Against Complex Interactions

A single user journey through a complex system can have multiple layers of interaction through the back and front of a web, or software, application. Architects, developers, and business people all need to have a shared understanding of a feature or service. How can we keep all the myriad stories, features, and enhancements in mind when creating code-based events but not get lost in the details?

That’s where flow mapping comes in. Flow mapping is similar to its big sister, story mapping. Both are methods to visualize work items from your Agile product backlog, but flow mapping occurs at a much more granular level. Usually limited to a single action and role through a system, it enhances the decision points and events shown by appending a layer of user stories and user interactions on a flowchart or process diagram of the journey. This flow map gives an overview of what is needed to create a robust process that minimizes risk through identification of high-failure areas, and it links the backlog to the events on the map, providing a clear overview of development tasks without compromising speed and agility.

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Presenters
avatar for Amber Haley

Amber Haley

Lead Consultant in Agile, Scrum and Kanban, Hyperaktiv.co
Hello there, I'm Amber and I'm a Kiwi export to Germany. | I have been focused on web and peripheral tech for the last 12 years or so, moving into in-depth planning and architecting of web applications in the last 9. | | I discovered Agile in 2008 and have focused on this and teams since then. | | If you find me, online or off, talk to me about anything to do with Scrum, Agile, Scaling, management 3.0, Techno, Gin and Tonic, and... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Fairbanks B

3:30pm

What Did the Smart Thing Say? Semantic Interoperability for the IoT

The ability of applications and services to operate across heterogeneous devices and domains is a major barrier to realizing the vision of the Internet of Things (IoT). A primary challenge is to develop standards and best practices that enable the seamless integration of multimodal data. This integrated data could support new types of applications and services that facilitate more comprehensive understanding, insights, and experiences with the things and people around us.

The goal is to achieve semantic interoperability, that is, to represent and exchange information in a form whose meaning is independent of the application generating or using it. Semantic interoperability accomplishes two important objectives:

  1. It enables service-level integration of IoT systems constructed using components from different vendors.
  2. It allows aggregation of data from different domains, such as systems in smart homes, smart cars, and smart cities, to allow for comprehensive data management and analytics.

Significant new business and innovation opportunities will emerge from multi-domain IoT systems. To realize that promise, IoT systems must be designed to support some level of commonality by defining interoperable data and metadata models, formats, and communication protocols. This talk presents various motivating use cases and introduces several example technologies to help get there. In particular, we will focus on the definition and use of semantic models and protocols for representing, exchanging, and integrating data useful for context awareness, personalization, and decentralized quality assurance for IoT systems, such as personalizing lights in your smart home.

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Presenters
avatar for Cory Henson

Cory Henson

Robert Bosch LLC
Cory Henson is a senior research scientist at the Bosch Research and Technology Center. He leads the design and development of protocols and data models for Bezirk, an open IoT platform utilized in a variety of cross-domain IoT solutions. Cory also holds an Adjunct Faculty position at Wright State University. Prior to his current assignment, Cory earned a PhD in Computer Science from WSU, where he worked with the Kno.e.sis Center applying... Read More →
avatar for João de Sousa

João de Sousa

Robert Bosch LLC
João de Sousa founded Bezirk after working as a senior expert on IoT consumer applications at Bosch. He is also an Adjunct Associate Professor with the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from CMU in 2005 and became an Assistant Professor at George Mason University before joining Bosch in 2012. Before coming to the United States, João worked for 10 years as a chief... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Fairbanks A

4:00pm

Chasing Critical Code Anomalies with JSpIRIT

As a software system evolves, its design structure often degrades and accumulates technical debt. The emergence of code smells, such as a God Class, is a well-known symptom of such problems. Although several tools exist for detecting code smells, the number of smells returned by current tools generally exceeds the number of problems developers can deal with. This is particularly evident when a team should focus on customer-visible features, and thus the time available for system restructuring is limited. Furthermore, not all smells require urgent attention, as they might not be related to architectural problems or business goals. In this context, having a tool that can prioritize critical smells is of great help for architects and developers.

To this end, we developed JSpIRIT (Java Smart Identification of Refactoring opportunITies) as a recommender system for ranking code smells according to multiple criteria. JSpIRIT performs a scanning of the system code, but its analysis is flexible enough to include information from past system versions, modifiability scenarios, and architectural components, among other assets. In the past few years, we have applied JSpIRIT to several Java projects with satisfactory results. Consequently, we have continued to improve the tool with more features. For instance, since smells often appear interrelated in the code, JSpIRIT provides insights to the developer about smell groupings. In addition, it offers visualizations for different smell configurations. We will present the key tool features and discuss project experiences in which JSpIRIT was useful for diagnosing the system “health” and planning for refactorings.

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Presenters
avatar for J. Andres Diaz-Pace

J. Andres Diaz-Pace

ISISTAN Research Institute, UNICEN University, and CONICET
J. Andres Diaz-Pace is a professor at UNICEN University (Tandil, Argentina) and an Independent Research Fellow of the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research of Argentina (CONICET). From 2007 to 2010, he was a member of the technical staff at the Software Engineering Institute. His research interests include quality-driven architecture design, AI and NLP techniques applied to software engineering, and architecture-based evolution... Read More →
avatar for Claudia Marcos

Claudia Marcos

Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires
Claudia Marcos has been a Professor in the School of Computer Science at Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (UNCPBA) since 1991. She is a CIC (Comisión de Investigación Científica de la provincia de Buenos Aires) researcher. From 2000 to 2005, she was co-director of the ISISTAN Research Institute. Her research interests include software evolution, requirements engineering, and agile development... Read More →
avatar for Santiago Vidal

Santiago Vidal

UNICEN and CONICET-Argentina
Santiago Vidal received the MSc and PhD degrees in Computer Science from UNICEN University in Tandil, Argentina, in 2011 and 2013, respectively. He is a Teacher Assistant in the Computer Science Department of UNICEN and a research fellow of CONICET-Argentina. His main research interests include software evolution and maintenance.


Tuesday May 3, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Fairbanks B

4:00pm

Introduction to Scala and Spark

In this presentation, I will first describe the Scala programming language and its position in the language space. I will then describe the Apache Spark programming model and its role in the Big Data space. Next, I will discuss the Scala features that make it the first choice for Spark programming, briefly commenting on the Python and Java alternatives. I will also cover some basic programming tools helpful for doing Scala-based Spark development. Finally, I will discuss my experience teaching these technologies in a graduate software engineering course.

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Presenters
avatar for Brad Rubin

Brad Rubin

University of St. Thomas
Brad Rubin is the Honeywell Fellow in Global Technology Management and Director of the Center of Excellence for Big Data at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, in the Graduate Programs in Software Department. He teaches Big Data Architecture, Software Analysis and Design, Computer Security, and Advanced Computer Security. His research agenda uses the Hadoop ecosystem.


Tuesday May 3, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Fairbanks C

4:00pm

IoT Reference Architectures and Case Studies

During the last several years, prominent speakers and media headliners have promised us a big future for the Internet of Things (IoT). While some predict that growth of internet-connected things will reach $50 billion by 2020, or estimate the total annual economic impact of the IoT at up to $11 trillion by 2025, others believe that by 2020 almost a quarter billion vehicles will be connected to the internet, thus forming key elements for the IoT era.

While all these predictions could become reality, there is plenty of work still to be done, and many prerequisites must be completed to enable this revolutionary growth. Even now, a typical software architect with a common computer software design background could be easily confused by the plethora of terms, concepts, proprietary standards, protocols, and solutions for internet-connected things. Some of these have a more than 40-year history with roots in pre-internet implementations. Needless to say, a modern software engineer who lives in the age of open-source software, Git, powerful integrated development environments, and software-defined everything can be simply overwhelmed.

In this session, we will share our vision on the current state of the standardization process for the IoT and discuss several reference architectures with mapping to modern IoT protocols, platforms, middleware, and cloud-based offerings. We will also present real-world case studies that cover in more detail some architecture concerns such as maintainability, security, power efficiency, availability, and autonomy.

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Presenters
avatar for Serhiy Haziyev

Serhiy Haziyev

SoftServe, Inc.
Serhiy Haziyev is VP of Software Architecture at SoftServe. Serhiy earned the Software Architecture Professional Certificate from the Software Engineering Institute and has more than 17 years of experience in Big Data, SaaS/cloud, service-oriented architecture, and carrier-grade telecommunication services. His activities at SoftServe include leading Architecture and Technology Consulting as well as conducting educational workshops at... Read More →
avatar for Yulian Slobodyan

Yulian Slobodyan

SoftServe, Inc.
Yulian Slobodyan works as a Senior Solutions Architect in Strategic Technologies at SoftServe. Yulian has more than 10 years’ experience in building SaaS, SOA, EAI, Big Data, CEP, and IoT solutions for a number of global companies in the health care, network/application monitoring, finance, and retail business domains. His current activities at SoftServe include leading the IoT Strategic Program, designing and implementing IoT and... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Fairbanks A

4:35pm

Ethics as a Quality Attribute

Software is everywhere, and the ubiquity of software raises the stakes in ways many software developers may not realize. Poorly architected software-intensive systems can result in end-user frustration, economic loss, and even the loss of human life. What’s more, modern software is developed under a variety of conditions and environments, some of which are unfair, unsafe, or otherwise hostile. While free lattes are not an inalienable human right, programmers should probably have the right to receive equal pay for equal work.

Beyond a few universal human rights, determining whether a given architectural design decision is ethical is not always a simple yes or no. For example, consider the case of an autonomous drone that finds itself in a situation where any decision it might make results in the loss of human life. A programmer today, right now, might be writing code that will make that decision.

As architects, I propose that we have a responsibility to define the ethical framework within which downstream designers will operate, in the same way that we define other quality attributes.

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Presenters
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Software Engineer, Watson Group, IBM
Michael Keeling is a senior software engineer at IBM, where he develops and maintains IBM’s Watson Explorer and Watson platforms. Michael is an experienced software architect, Agile practitioner, and programmer, having worked on projects ranging from combat systems to search to web apps. He holds a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 4:35pm - 4:50pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

4:50pm

Love Your Architecture!

Most nontrivial software systems suffer from significant levels of technical and architectural debt. This leads to exponentially increasing cost of change, which is not sustainable for a longer period of time. The single best thing you can do to counter this problem is to give some love to your architecture by carefully managing and controlling the dependencies among the different elements and components of a software system. This session will first look at the major reasons why so many systems end up in an unmaintainable state and then show how to address the problem by using automated quality gates in combination with a domain-specific language that can be used to enforce an architectural blueprint over the lifetime of a software system.


Presenters
avatar for Alexander von Zitzewitz

Alexander von Zitzewitz

hello2morrow, Inc.
Alexander von Zitzewitz is a serial entrepreneur in the software business and one of the founders of hello2morrow, an independent software vendor specializing in static analysis tools that can enforce architecture and quality rules during development and maintenance of software systems. He has worked in the industry since the early 1980s and focuses on the role of software architecture and technical quality for successful project outcomes. He... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 4:50pm - 5:05pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

5:30pm

SATURN Celebration Reception at Petco Park, followed by San Diego Padres vs. Colorado Rockies baseball game
Buses will transport SATURN attendees to Petco Park, home of the San Diego Padres baseball team. There, we will enjoy a buffet dinner in a dedicated space to socialize and enjoy the evening's baseball game. Buses will return attendees to the hotel throughout the evening and after the game concludes.

Tuesday May 3, 2016 5:30pm - 10:00pm
TBA
 
Wednesday, May 4
 

8:30am

Morning Remarks
Presenters
avatar for Amine Chigani

Amine Chigani

GE Digital
Amine Chigani is a Principal Architect at GE Digital. His work focuses on building Industrial IoT solutions on the Predix™ Platform for GE businesses and their customers. He’s equally passionate about the software he builds and about how architecture is employed in building such software across the organization. Amine is a founding member and contributor in the Industrial Internet Consortium’s technology working group. Prior... Read More →
avatar for Bill Pollak

Bill Pollak

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Leading Advisor, Statoil ASA
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong beliefs in open source and internet technology. Currently he holds the position of leading advisor in corporate IT at Statoil, focusing on the subsurface application portfolio and systems integration challenges. He holds an MSc in Computer Science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).


Wednesday May 4, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom

9:00am

Keynote: Rethinking Software Design

The essence of design is structure: What parts comprise the whole and how are they related? In the field of software, we have ways to structure implementation—with functions and datatypes, design patterns, architectures, and so on—but we lack a way to structure behavior. Witness the way we sometimes talk of having “thousands of requirements,” although a requirement is usually little more than a transition in a state machine.

To make software that is more usable and more robust, we need a way to structure behavior. Just as architects design the structure of a building in terms of light and space and flow, leaving to engineers the task of designing the physical structures that will support their visions, so we need software architects who can shape software independently of its realization.

In this talk, I'll present the elements of a new theory of software design that provides a structuring principle for behavior, criteria for identifying good and bad structures, and patterns to emulate. I'll also report on our experience applying the theory on a variety of systems.

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See an artist's rendering.


Presenters
avatar for Daniel Jackson

Daniel Jackson

MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Daniel Jackson is Professor of Computer Science at MIT, a MacVicar teaching fellow, and Associate Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT’s largest laboratory. He is the lead designer of the Alloy modeling language and author of Software Abstractions: Logic, Language, and Analysis (MIT Press, 2nd ed., 2012). He was chair of the National Academies study Software for... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom

10:30am

How to Manage a Network of Software Architects Within Your Company

Since 2007 Siemens has released several learning and certification programs for software, system, and test architects as part of the Software Initiative Curriculum. Due to their positive influence in their own organizations, certified architects have gained high visibility and more appreciation over the years. A key element of the Siemens curriculum is active management of the network of certified architects across an organization. Major elements of this approach include dedicated social network groups, wikis, alumni meetings, and company-wide improvement projects with volunteering certified architects. This presentation gives an overview of how to manage these networking elements and discusses the effort behind it.

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Presenters
avatar for Ruediger Kreuter

Ruediger Kreuter

Siemens AG
Ruediger Kreuter drives the Software Initiative Curriculum project, which has a strong focus on training and qualification of software, system, and test architects as well as other related roles. This includes all aspects, such as networking activities, that enable a vibrant online and in-person community at Siemens. He is one of the key drivers of the software competence project at Siemens that takes a holistic and systematic approach as we find... Read More →
avatar for Frances Paulisch

Frances Paulisch

Siemens AG
Frances Paulisch is the leader of the Siemens Software Initiative, a cross-company initiative focused on software and digitalization that includes strategic topics, best practice sharing, reporting, and training. A main focus of her work is empowering cross-functional teams to work together well over the whole development lifecycle, especially when considering relevant quality attributes such as performance, security, and scalability. Dr... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Fairbanks B

10:30am

Software Architecture Boot Camp: How to Document the Architecture of Your Application Using UML and More

Have you ever been confused by an arrow in a box-and-line design diagram? Do you use the Unified Modeling Language (UML) in your software architecture? Have you ever wondered, “Where is the line between architecture and detailed design?” If you answered yes to any of these questions, this tutorial has practical and valuable information for you.

The goal is to show you what information about an architecture to capture so that others can successfully use it, maintain it, and build a system from it. Important takeaways from this talk include the multiple views of architecture; how we can use UML in each view and when other notations work better; what views we can use to evaluate performance, availability, modifiability, and other qualities; how to complement structural diagrams with sequence diagrams, statecharts, and other behavior diagrams; and guidelines and templates to make your architecture documentation more effective.


Presenters
avatar for Paulo Merson

Paulo Merson

Software Architect, Brazilian Federal Court of Accounts (TCU)
Software Architecture in general, but in particular SOA, microservices, architecture enforcement, and architecture documentation.


Wednesday May 4, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks D

10:30am

Getting Your System to Production and Keeping It There

It can be dispiriting to find that what seemed to be a well-designed system, carefully implemented by an Agile team, runs into problems as soon as it hits production, but such things do happen. Conversely how is it that gnarled old systems containing tangled code and without a unit test in sight are often successful production applications and run reliably for years?

Today the DevOps movement aims to prevent problems when systems reach production by unifying the work of development, application management, and production operations staff. This is a terrific step forward, but we still need actionable advice that architects and development teams can apply to prevent this Dev–Ops interaction from being a frustrating and ineffective process.

This session will explore why good software development practice is important but ultimately isn’t sufficient to create a reliable and effective enterprise system. We will discuss what being “production ready” really means and then look at the design forces that this implies for our systems. This inquiry will allow us to understand the principles, patterns, and practices that architects need to know and apply in order to work with our Ops colleagues, get our systems into production, and keep them there.

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Presenters
avatar for Eoin Woods

Eoin Woods

Endava
Eoin Woods is CTO at Endava, the European IT services company; an author; a conference speaker; and an active member of the London software engineering community. His main technical interests include software architecture, distributed systems, and computer security.


Wednesday May 4, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks C

10:30am

IoT Lab

This is a participatory session where users can see, touch, and use a variety of IoT hardware and sensors. Hardware and development environments will be provided so that participants can see how development is done on different platforms. We will also explore various languages and technologies used for this development. Multiple examples of boards will be provided for use during the session, including

  • Intel Edison
  • Arduino
  • Raspberry Pi
  • Samsung Artik
  • ESP8266
  • Onion Omega
  • Particle Photon

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Presenters
avatar for Paul Langdon

Paul Langdon

Founder/Architect, BLT Robotics
Paul Langdon has over 20 years’ experience as a software engineer and architect in the financial and health-care sectors. He spent the last two years developing award-winning IoT products and applications using commodity hardware. Paul is a contributing author and member of Intel’s Innovator Program, teacher of IoT hardware and technologies, and founder of the “Innovation Think” series with a focus on IoT and hardware... Read More →



Wednesday May 4, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks A

11:00am

Can’t Find Superheroes to Help You Out of a Crisis? How About Some Architecture and Lots of Superglue?

This is the story of an organization that found itself in the midst of a crisis, struggling to meet project timelines while adhering to a strict high-quality bar, but seemingly unable to scale up to a challenging roadmap and evolving market as the project’s technical debt grew. Among the numerous task forces set up to handle the execution crisis, a software architecture team was formed, entrusted with creating a software vision befitting an organization that, regardless of the crisis, was required to grow its business into new market segments.

While facing several silo teams, each in turn facing a steady stream of new features to develop on top of a significant legacy codebase, the team of architects had to build trust with engineers as well as with managers, by understanding their pain points and providing value through pragmatic solutions. Eventually, more than just “architecting,” the team aspired to serve as the organization’s superglue, fostering collaboration across disciplines, projects, and teams.

In this talk, we will share with you our experience of building this software architecture team at one of Intel’s R&D organizations during the last four years, helping an organization without well-established software architecture practices to get out of the crisis and start building its software to meet its growing business needs. We talk about our successful (and our less successful) experiences in establishing the architect’s role and share our vision and practices.

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Presenters
avatar for Adam Bar-Niv

Adam Bar-Niv

Software Architect, Intel
Adam Bar-Niv is a Software Architect at Intel’s Communications and Devices Group. For the past 9 years, he has been developing Intel’s wireless technologies across the stack as a software developer, system engineer, and currently software architect at the WiFi R&D division. His passion is making full-stack projects, soldering (and blowing up) capacitors, debugging code on embedded micro controllers, and deploying web services for wireless... Read More →
avatar for Amir Shenhav

Amir Shenhav

Intel
Amir Shenhav is a technical leader and manager of a software architecture team at Intel’s Communications and Devices Group in the Wi-Fi R&D Division. Amir has over 18 years of industry experience in the domain of embedded systems and software, taking lead roles in architecting solutions, mainly for communication and information security systems. Over the years, Amir had the chance to establish from scratch two software architecture... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am
Fairbanks B

11:30am

Bridging System Architecture

A bridging system is a home-grown routing solution to route traffic to either a new or legacy system during data migration. The bridging system is used to support core systems transformation efforts, mergers and acquisitions such as Billing System Transformation, and Order Management System Transformation or Consolidation in various industries including telecommunication, transportation, and consumer/commercial products distribution. The bridging system architecture mandates scalability, flexibility, and high performance to minimize the impacts of system downtime and to make the system transformation seamless to end users during data migration. The bridging system can also be architected to serve as a data segmentation router to support an Active/Active data center model after the data migration is complete. This presentation will show what a home-grown bridging system architecture looks like; how it works end to end to satisfy business needs in terms of system architecture, the technology stack, major components design, and integration to impacted applications; and performance considerations.

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Presenters
avatar for Charles Chow

Charles Chow

Deloitte Consulting
Charles Chow is a seasoned, hands-on enterprise software and systems executive with 25 years of technology-transformation experience. Charles is with Deloitte’s Technology, Media, and Telecom sectors. He led multiple large programs with Fortune 500 companies. Before joining Deloitte, Charles led innovative programs such as revamping a Digital Media Assets delivery system and implementing the first statewide eFiling program for the State... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks B

1:00pm

Keynote: Architecture and the Evolution of Complex Systems

The frameworks that formal architectures supply both enable and constrain certain types of design decisions and desired system qualities. Just like laws and cultural conventions, they embody the values and belief systems of people even though it may not always be obvious to the casual user or even to the original architects themselves.

Today the world is in the midst of laying down a communication and decision fabric that will connect trillions of people, objects, and intelligent machines into the most complex cyber-physical system that the world has ever imagined. The emerging Industrial Internet will connect systems that our lives depend on such as power systems, transportation systems, and healthcare networks.

It has been proposed that globalization has made the world "flat," but is the next generation of network and business architectures now destined to make the world "shallow"? Lost in a seemingly endless fog of distractions and short-term weak connections, will the urge to be connected overwhelm our ability to remain cognitive and free individuals? Has "The Medium" changed the message again without our having knowingly approved? As machines increasingly evolve with stronger forms of artificial intelligence and cognitive computing, they will become more human-like. More importantly as we become a collection of networked beings, will we become more machine-like, twitching and tweeting an endless stream of bits, or will we achieve a higher level of awareness and sophistication? What is our destiny?

Clearly it is a matter of architecture. The systems of systems we are building now will alter how we later process critical information, choose to innovate, and interact with man and machine in the future. In this talk, I will examine the formation of the Industrial Internet Consortium and the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute with this in mind and compare them with respect to their stakeholders, business models, and emerging architectures.

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Presenters
avatar for Joseph Salvo

Joseph Salvo

GE Global Research and Industrial Internet Consortium
Dr. Salvo is the Director and Founder of the Industrial Internet Consortium, which aims to connect brilliant minds and machines in powerful value-creation networks. For the past 15 years, he and his laboratory have developed a series of large-scale Internet-based sensing arrays to manage and oversee business systems and deliver a portfolio of information-based services. Some of their commercial business releases include complex decision platforms... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

2:30pm

The Business Model Canvas Pattern: From Concept to Product Architecture in an Agile World

This session is based on my experience leading GE Digital teams to develop solutions for external customers that incorporate the Business Model Canvas pattern in architecting microservice-based solutions. As in many software development organizations, adopting a cloud platform empowers our developers to develop, test, and deliver applications at an unprecedented rate. In addition, microservice-based architecture enables us to deliver scalable business-aligned capabilities and manage them much more effectively than monoliths.

In this development context, however, challenges remain:

  • How do we ensure that product architecture addresses real customer needs?
  • How do we align a continuous DevOps mode of development with a consistent business model?
  • How can an agile development team evolve product architecture iteratively? 

In my talk, I’ll describe an approach to successfully address such challenges inspired by Design Thinking Business Analysis: Business Concept Mapping Applied, by Thomas Frisendal. I extend the author's work to product architecture and agile development to enable teams to align with a customer’s needs by validating for desirability, viability, and feasibility.

First, I will summarize the Lean Business Canvas, Concept Maps, and Domain-Driven Design patterns. Second, I will introduce the details of a novel lean approach to developing product architecture that combines Business/Lean Model Canvas, Design Thinking, and Agile practices. Architects will learn how to  

  • use the Business Model Canvas or Lean Canvas to capture requirements from different stakeholders
  • map the business model to business concepts using design thinking and concept mapping
  • rapidly design microservice APIs that reflect business needs before launching into detailed implementations

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Presenters
avatar for Arila Barnes

Arila Barnes

GE Digital
Arila Barnes is a Senior Staff Architect at GE Digital in San Ramon, CA, with over 15 years’ experience in software development and architecture and over 10 years applying Agile practices in delivering software products. She joined GE Software in 2013 and has been actively involved in the Predix cloud platform from product architecture to feature development. Prior to joining GE Digital, Arila was Principal Text Analytics Architect with SAS... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Fairbanks B

2:30pm

Big Analog Data™, New Architectures to Realize New Insights

The Industrial Internet of Things megatrend is generating massive amounts of data from a wide range of new data sources. The big source of new data is analog data, coming from sensors tied to machines, electronic devices, and the environment. Big Analog Data™ sources are all around us (light, RF signals, vibrations, temperatures, and so on). We will need new architectures and approaches to manage and process this data at the edge and in the cloud to extract insights and drive business impact.

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Presenters
avatar for Jamie Smith

Jamie Smith

National Instruments
As director of product marketing for embedded systems at NI, Jamie Smith leads the product marketing team for the company’s industrial and embedded products, including NI CompactRIO, vision, motion, and wireless. Since joining NI in 1996 as an application engineer, Jamie has held key leadership positions in sales, engineering, product strategy, corporate development, and marketing. In 2012, he was recognized as a Top Embedded Innovator by... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Fairbanks A

2:30pm

Centralized vs. Decentralized Approaches to SOA: Hamilton vs. Jefferson

Modern service-oriented architecture (SOA) systems force teams to reconcile a multitude of organizational and technology decisions. With each decision, the team reaffirms allegiance to its chosen message passing, platform governance, and quality assurance philosophy. Which side are you on: Centralized SOA or Decentralized SOA?

During this session, we will explore essential topics in modern SOA including governance, message passing strategies, orchestration, “smart” and “dumb” pipes, quality assurance strategies, deployment, and many other topics. For each topic, we’ll cover the most important information you need to know and debate the pros and cons of a centralized and decentralized approach.

And because it’s Michael and George hosting this session, we can’t just leave it at that. In the spirit of the American Federalists (strong central government) vs. Antifederalists (decentralized government) of the 1790s, George, playing the role of a modern Jefferson, will advocate for decentralized SOA while Michael, as a modern Hamilton, will attempt to convince you, the audience, that centralized SOA is the best path forward. This is a session you will not want to miss!

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Presenters
avatar for George Fairbanks

George Fairbanks

Google
George Fairbanks has been teaching software architecture and design since 1998, is the author of the book Just Enough Software Architecture, has a PhD in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and is a software engineer at Google.
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Software Engineer, Watson Group, IBM
Michael Keeling is a senior software engineer at IBM, where he develops and maintains IBM’s Watson Explorer and Watson platforms. Michael is an experienced software architect, Agile practitioner, and programmer, having worked on projects ranging from combat systems to search to web apps. He holds a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Fairbanks C

2:30pm

Draw It Out: The Power of Visual Communication (Limited to 20 participants; sign up at the registration desk)

Want to kick-start (or improve) your visual presentation and documentation skills? Increase your visual IQ at the whiteboard during collaborative design sessions? Hone your architecture drawing capabilities in general? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, this workshop is for you.

From brainstorming and whiteboard sketching to concept presentations and formal documentation, architects need nimble visualization skills to communicate quickly and clearly their architecture decisions and artifacts—without a lot of words or verbal explanations.

In this hands-on activity session, MJ and Amine will package their respective experiences in UX design and architecture to coach participants through a series of revelatory exercises that get past self-judgment and into effective visualization techniques applicable to architects. We will directly confront the sometimes daunting challenge of drawing in real time with practical tips for framing context and engaging others in visual thinking. We will focus on ways to build a visual lexicon and improve lettering skills … all while having fun. Participants will come away with a transformed attitude about their ability to draw their architecture artifacts and a new access to visual storytelling.

Get the slides and the worksheet.


Presenters
avatar for MJ Broadbent

MJ Broadbent

GE Digital
MJ Broadbent is a UX Design Director at GE Digital, where she leads a team creating intelligent solutions that connect people, data, and machines via Predix™, GE’s Industrial Internet platform. Over the past 25 years, her design leadership and creative expertise has benefited organizations including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The College Board, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, Sony Electronics, Standard & Poor’s... Read More →
avatar for Amine Chigani

Amine Chigani

GE Digital
Amine Chigani is a Principal Architect at GE Digital. His work focuses on building Industrial IoT solutions on the Predix™ Platform for GE businesses and their customers. He’s equally passionate about the software he builds and about how architecture is employed in building such software across the organization. Amine is a founding member and contributor in the Industrial Internet Consortium’s technology working group. Prior... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Fairbanks D

3:00pm

Architecting Agile Businesses: A Guideline for the Business-Oriented Software Architect

Software architecture is a key enabler of business strategy, and it must provide value. What guidelines exist for the business-oriented software architect, and how do they correlate with an Agile business model? Business involves a number of dimensions that the architect must understand, including negotiations, risk management, business analysis, and communication skills. But more importantly, the architect must be able to align the business strategy with the software architecture. He or she must document the architecture in a way that shows how the system context derives from the business context. Typically, though, the requirements documents gathered from stakeholders do not capture the quality attributes well enough.

To overcome this constraint, architects must evaluate the architecture by engaging stakeholders early in the software development process, negotiating the system’s priorities, and making tradeoffs. Scenario-based techniques like the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) provide one of the most general and effective approaches for achieving this. But to attain true business agility, a combination of the ATAM and the service-oriented architecture (SOA) pattern is suggested. The SOA pattern applies defined business functionalities built as software components to create interoperable services. SOA provides a well-designed interface protocol for integrating different services that are flexible enough to anticipate future change, a key feature for business agility. The role of software architects must not be limited to the technicalities of designing the software alone. This presentation suggests a method for architecting Agile businesses using the architecture practice at Konga, an African e-commerce company, as a case study.

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Presenters
avatar for Kaine Ugwu

Kaine Ugwu

Konga Online Shopping, Ltd.
Kaine Ugwu is a Solutions Architect with 10 years’ experience in architecting and engineering software and enterprise systems. He currently designs architecture for Konga, a Nigerian e-commerce company. At Konga, he is responsible for planning new technology insertion, assisting business in formulating clear requirements, and managing risk identification and mitigation strategies associated with the architecture.


Wednesday May 4, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Fairbanks B

3:30pm

Applying Architecture Techniques to Anchor System Evolution Roadmaps

Technology changes and new (functional) features are two common drivers for evolving a software system and, often, its underlying architecture. In these cases, an evolution roadmap that provides a sequence of tasks and activities with a clear rationale is needed and, furthermore, often demanded by management.

In our experience, producing such a roadmap can be challenging, even when the source and the target systems are known, due to various business, technology, and operational concerns at play that affect the evolution paths and hinder a global analysis by the project stakeholders. Thus, we argue that evolution planning must be a shared responsibility between managers and architects.

In this presentation, we discuss experiences in applying a set of architectural techniques—utility trees, scenarios, and architectural views—to perform architectural assessments of source and target software architectures with the goal of generating an evolution roadmap that facilitates a risk analysis and a convergence of the stakeholders’ decisions. These experiences are based on two projects centered on business process management (BPM) solutions and a third one involving a legacy core in the banking and telecom domains. As the main lessons learned, we can say that architecturally informed roadmaps help decision makers to understand

  • which mix of architectural capabilities should be delivered along the evolution path
  • risks associated with the tasks of the roadmap
  • system options that can be enabled by architectural capabilities

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Presenters
avatar for Alejandro Bianchi

Alejandro Bianchi

LIVEWARE IS SA
Alejandro Bianchi has been Partner and President of LIVEWARE Software Engineering since 1993. He holds a bachelor’s degree in analysis of information systems and a master’s degree in strategic management from the Universidad Argentina de la Empresa. He also holds Software Architecture Professional and ATAM Evaluator Certificates from the Software Engineering Institute. He has been a professor at the National University of La Plata... Read More →
avatar for J. Andres Diaz-Pace

J. Andres Diaz-Pace

ISISTAN Research Institute, UNICEN University, and CONICET
J. Andres Diaz-Pace is a professor at UNICEN University (Tandil, Argentina) and an Independent Research Fellow of the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research of Argentina (CONICET). From 2007 to 2010, he was a member of the technical staff at the Software Engineering Institute. His research interests include quality-driven architecture design, AI and NLP techniques applied to software engineering, and architecture-based evolution... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Fairbanks B

4:15pm

The Demise of Enterprise IT

The time for IT to be a provider of big systems is over. Businesses know how to solve their problems, and IT should get out of the way and let them. The role of IT should be to provide software engineering competence and infrastructure to enable a business to create solutions for its challenges. Enterprise architecture and software architecture can be instruments that a business uses to understand where the solutions fit in the larger landscape and how best to utilize existing components. How can we provide this essential tool to the business in order to let it solve its own problems while we ensure a consistent software architecture and system landscape?

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Presenters
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Leading Advisor, Statoil ASA
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong beliefs in open source and internet technology. Currently he holds the position of leading advisor in corporate IT at Statoil, focusing on the subsurface application portfolio and systems integration challenges. He holds an MSc in Computer Science from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).


Wednesday May 4, 2016 4:15pm - 4:30pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

4:30pm

Going Bezirk: Things Plus Cloud Do Not Equal IoT

Like many organizations, Bosch is finding its way toward the Internet of Things (IoT). One obvious challenge is the lack of interoperability standards for the IoT. Are we designing the IoT by default? Will the resulting systems have technical, business, and social properties that we can be proud of? Cloud-centric architectures for IoT applications have drawbacks concerning responsiveness, multi-vendor fragmentation, and rampant threats to consumer privacy. We claim that similar levels of service, or higher, can be achieved with a system-of-systems approach.

Bezirk is an architectural framework for the consumer-space IoT being developed at Bosch. By building on a brokerless publish–subscribe middleware and promoting open, decentralized systems, the framework places greater emphasis on interoperability protocols, such as for context awareness and personalization, than on the features of “central” or “indispensable” components. By enforcing a user-centric privacy model at the middleware level, it shifts the power to control data exchanges from companies and application developers to end users.

This talk motivates and describes the framework and showcases applications under development. If your smart home is spying on you, go Bezirk.

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Presenters
avatar for Cory Henson

Cory Henson

Robert Bosch LLC
Cory Henson is a senior research scientist at the Bosch Research and Technology Center. He leads the design and development of protocols and data models for Bezirk, an open IoT platform utilized in a variety of cross-domain IoT solutions. Cory also holds an Adjunct Faculty position at Wright State University. Prior to his current assignment, Cory earned a PhD in Computer Science from WSU, where he worked with the Kno.e.sis Center applying... Read More →
avatar for João de Sousa

João de Sousa

Robert Bosch LLC
João de Sousa founded Bezirk after working as a senior expert on IoT consumer applications at Bosch. He is also an Adjunct Associate Professor with the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from CMU in 2005 and became an Assistant Professor at George Mason University before joining Bosch in 2012. Before coming to the United States, João worked for 10 years as a chief... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

4:45pm

Zen of Software Architecture

Do you dream of working on a team of enlightened people who create software that users love? Stop dreaming and start living! This DEV@SATURN talk will get you started on your journey.

Zen is now ready to overtake our offices and enable our teams to create software together. I’ve spent more than 15 years in software development and gone from being a web developer, to a database administrator, to a project manager, to a business analyst, to an end-to-end solutions architect, to a product manager. The patterns I see repeated over and over again include teams missing deadlines, unhappy users, buggy code, and over-budget software. The reasons I blame for this are also the same time and time again: teams fighting, not understanding each other, being stuck in the past, not understanding the users, and overall stressful team environments.

This presentation lays out a step-by-step process to create a new awareness, first in yourself and then, you’ll be surprised to notice, in your team members.

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Presenters
avatar for Bett Bollhoefer

Bett Bollhoefer

GE Digital
Bett Bollhoefer has worked in the IT and development space since 1999. She is a Distinguished Toastmaster, former President of Distinguished Division Governor in Toastmasters, and winner of the Division Governor of the Year award. Before joining GE, she first worked as a developer, then as a Solutions Architect at Verizon. Today, Bett is an Architect at GE Digital focused on Predix Platform Architecture. To round out her technical expertise, Bett... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

5:00pm

6:00pm

Kids and IoT: An Integrated IoT Educational Platform

The Internet of Things and “Industry 4.0” will profoundly change the world that we live in and the jobs of the future. It only makes sense—as parents, teachers, and software architects—that we make sure to consider how we are preparing the coming generation for these changes and career opportunities. As a tech-savvy parent who is raising two “digital-native” children (ages 14 and 11), I have seen firsthand how this upcoming generation interacts with technology. I have coached Lego Robotics; taught Arduino, introductory Linux, Minecraft server, and modding classes; and tried to get kids engaged in creative programming activities. But until now I haven’t been able to find a teaching architecture that ties it all together with a specific goal and purpose.

This session will discuss my experiences over the past six years as a parent-teacher of technology to this digital-native generation and will present, with live demos and live digital natives (kids), an IoT teaching platform based on Chromebooks, Linux, NodeJS, Arduinos, Raspberry Pi, NodeMCU, MQTT, Minecraft, Unity, and Node-Red.


Presenters
avatar for Kent Meyer

Kent Meyer

Emcraft Systems
Kent Meyer has been in the technology industry for 34 years, working at a compiler company and a real-time operating system company as well as founding a telecommunications infrastructure company and founding and directing a hardware ARM/Linux system-on-module company. It’s been an interesting and challenging career, spanning a wide background, but he still struggles to keep up with his children, who are “digital natives,&rdquo... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Catalina Ballroom
 
Thursday, May 5
 

8:30am

Office Hours
Thursday May 5, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Fairbanks D

8:30am

Agile Architecture Roadmapping

In the Agile world, architecture is about making design decisions with just enough anticipation. Too much anticipation leads to overly heavy architectural constructs that may never be used (YAGNI); too little anticipation leads to expensive refactoring and potentially fatal build-up of technical debt.

In this session, we present an approach for Agile architecture roadmapping with just enough anticipation. The approach consists of principles and practices that help address questions like

  • How do we anticipate and embrace changes in our solution’s environment?
  • What are good roadmapping strategies, and how do organizations choose the right strategy in a particular context?
  • Should we do “up-front” architecting and, if so, how much?
  • How can we organize architectural decision making in Agile teams?
  • What tools should architects use to achieve “just enough” anticipation?

We will present experiences from architects who have used this approach in practice in multiple organizations. Their experiences show more realistic stakeholder expectations and better prioritization of required architectural improvements.

The tutorial is based on Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture (RCDA), an approach developed by CGI that has proven to support solution architects globally in a lean and Agile manner. RCDA is a recognized architecture method in The Open Group’s architect certification program.

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Presenters
avatar for Eltjo Poort

Eltjo Poort

CGI
Eltjo R. Poort is a Distinguished Solution Architect at CGI in The Netherlands. In his 30-year career in the software industry, he has fulfilled many engineering and project management roles. In the 1990s, he oversaw the implementation of the first SMS text messaging systems in the United States. In the last decade, he published work on improving architecting practices, including his PhD thesis in 2012. Eltjo is best known for his work on Risk... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Fairbanks C

8:30am

Building a Data-Friendly Platform for a Data-Driven Future
The Internet of Things is real today, and it will only get bigger as more devices, sensors, automobiles, and entire countries go online in the years to come. In this talk, Ben Hindman will explain the types of data-processing systems required to keep up with all the events that these "things" will generate and send back to data centers, and how this new data architecture is changing the requirements around infrastructure management. If you're going to run next-generation applications that connect millions of devices to a handful of complex distributed systems, you need an operating system that's designed for scalability, automation, and simplicity.

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Presenters
avatar for Ben Hindman

Ben Hindman

Mesosphere
Benjamin Hindman is a Founder and Chief Architect at Mesosphere, where he leads a team that is building out core services for the Mesosphere Datacenter Operating System (DCOS). Ben co-created Apache Mesos as a PhD student at UC Berkeley before bringing it to Twitter, where it now runs on tens of thousands of machines powering Twitter's data centers. An academic at heart, his research in programming languages and distributed systems has been... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Fairbanks A

8:30am

Security Design Refinement Through Mapping Tactics to Patterns

Tactics are a set of generic design primitives that underlie software architecture design. Security tactics are a principled starting point in designing a secure software architecture. Because they are primitives, security tactics are inherently abstract. It is up to individual software architects, on their own, to refine these tactics to more specific design decisions. For this reason, they need guidance to facilitate and regularize this refinement process.

One form of this guidance is to provide explicit mappings between tactics and security patterns, which are refinements of security tactics: less abstract and closer to code. Identifying concrete relationships between tactics and patterns will save architects (who are not, in general, security experts) the trouble of drawing such links themselves. Such predefined mappings may also prevent architects from making incorrect refinements from tactics to patterns, and from there into code.

This participatory session will begin by introducing and familiarizing participants with the concepts of software security, security tactics, and security patterns. Then we will proceed to a group activity. The purposes of this hands-on exercise include

  • empowering participants to customize their own security tactics hierarchy and security pattern collection
  • teaching participants the mechanics of the tactics-refinement process so that they can conduct their own refinement process in the future

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Presenters
avatar for Rick Kazman

Rick Kazman

University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Rick Kazman is a Professor at the University of Hawaii and a Research Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute. His primary research interests are software architecture, design and analysis tools, software visualization, and software engineering economics. He is the author of over 150 papers and co-author of several books, including Software Architecture in Practice and Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies. Kazman... Read More →
avatar for Jungwoo Ryoo

Jungwoo Ryoo

Pennsylvania State University
Jungwoo Ryoo is an Associate Professor in the Information Sciences and Technology (IST) Department at Pennsylvania State University–Altoona. Ryoo is also a graduate and affiliated faculty member of the College of IST at Penn State. He is a technical editor for IEEE Communications Magazine and works with IEEE as a consultant. His research interests include information security and assurance, software engineering, and computer networking... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am
Fairbanks B

10:30am

Strategic Prototyping for Developing Big-Data Systems

Conventional evolutionary prototyping for Small Data system development is inadequate and too expensive for identifying, analyzing, and mitigating risks in Big Data system development. This article presents RASP (Risk-based, Architecture-centric Strategic Prototyping)—a model for cost-effective, systematic risk management—and shows how it is deployed in Agile and Big Data system development. The RASP model advocates using prototyping strategically and only in areas that architecture analysis cannot sufficiently address. In RASP, less costly MVP (minimum viable product), throw-away, and vertical evolutionary prototypes are used strategically, instead of blindly building full-scale prototypes. The RASP model is validated in an embedded case study of nine Big Data projects with a global outsourcing firm. A decision flowchart and guidelines distilled from lessons learned for whether, when, and how to do strategic prototyping are provided.

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Presenters
avatar for Hong-Mei Chen

Hong-Mei Chen

University of Hawaii
Dr. Hong-Mei Chen is a Professor of Information Technology Management in the Shidler College of Business at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She formerly served as an Associate Dean for the college and Founder/Director of the Advanced Information Management Solutions Lab. Dr. Chen conducts cross-disciplinary empirical research on information systems design and development. She has directed several multimillion dollar, multi-institution research... Read More →
avatar for Serhiy Haziyev

Serhiy Haziyev

SoftServe, Inc.
Serhiy Haziyev is VP of Software Architecture at SoftServe. Serhiy earned the Software Architecture Professional Certificate from the Software Engineering Institute and has more than 17 years of experience in Big Data, SaaS/cloud, service-oriented architecture, and carrier-grade telecommunication services. His activities at SoftServe include leading Architecture and Technology Consulting as well as conducting educational workshops at... Read More →
avatar for Olha Hrytsay

Olha Hrytsay

SoftServe, Inc.
Olha Hrytsay works as a BI/DW consultant at SoftServe, Inc., a leading global outsourced product and application development company. Olha has more than seven years of experience in building business intelligence, data warehousing, and big-data solutions for a number of global companies in the network security, health care, and finance business domains. Her current activities at SoftServe include leading the BI Center of Excellence as... Read More →
avatar for Rick Kazman

Rick Kazman

University of Hawaii and Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Rick Kazman is a Professor at the University of Hawaii and a Research Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute. His primary research interests are software architecture, design and analysis tools, software visualization, and software engineering economics. He is the author of over 150 papers and co-author of several books, including Software Architecture in Practice and Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies. Kazman... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Fairbanks A

10:30am

The Tale of Three ATAMs for the Same Project

In the domain of Internet of Things connectivity and data processing for medical devices, an ​​enterprise IT project of significant size ​was experiencing problems ​with reliability and performance. Three reviews were performed on this project, in various stages, using the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM):

  1. an existing, old project ​with problems ​​(an architecture grown over the years​)​
  2. a reference architecture to be considered as a replacement of the old architecture
  3. an implementation architecture that used specific cloud solutions and services

This experience report contains lessons learned from

  • translating results of each ATAM into actionable changes in the organization
  • deriving technical decisions from each ATAM review
  • using ATAM results to help select solution, service, and technology providers
  • differences in ​the ATAM for the reference architecture and the ATAM for the specific implementation architecture​

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Presenters
avatar for Andrzej Knafel

Andrzej Knafel

Roche Diagnostics International, Ltd.
Andrzej Knafel is Chief Software Architect at Roche Diagnostics International in Switzerland. His experience includes leading international teams and multisite software development projects with a focus on automation, connectivity, security, and data management in health-care applications; international cooperation with companies, consortia, and public organizations; and working with multicultural teams (living in six countries on two... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Fairbanks B

10:30am

Office Hours
Thursday May 5, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks D

10:30am

Continuous Architecture

Today’s software delivery teams are expected to operate at internet time and scale. These expectations have broadened the adoption of Agile and Continuous Delivery practices. As a result, the pendulum has swung away from traditional software architecture practices and, in particular, enterprise architecture. We do not believe that the pendulum will swing back to these traditional practices. However, practitioners still need an architectural approach that can encompass Continuous Delivery and Agile practices, providing it with a broader architectural perspective. Continuous Architecture addresses this concern.

Continuous Architecture is based on six principles and a set of tools that support them. It is not a formal process; rather, it is based on practical experience of architecting solutions in large enterprises. As enterprises struggle to implement Agile and Continuous Delivery practices at scale, Continuous Architecture will become more important. Adopting a flexible but structured architecture approach is critical to finding the right balance.

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Presenters
ME

Murat Erder

Deutsche Bank
Murat Erder is a Director at Deutsche Bank and works in the Data Engineering group of the Chief Data Office. Before this, Murat was the Domain Architect for Reference Data; he also led the Integration Services group. Before joining Deutsche Bank, Murat worked for management consulting organizations, including KPMG/BearingPoint and Deloitte, providing architecture and technology strategy advice to leading financial services organizations. Murat... Read More →
avatar for Pierre Pureur

Pierre Pureur

Travelers
Pierre Pureur is Vice President and Chief Enterprise Architect for Travelers and leads the Enterprise Architecture group that includes Application Platform, Information, Infrastructure, Performance, and Security Architectures. Before this, Pierre was the Vice President of Architecture for Personal Insurance Business Technology at Travelers. Pierre has also worked for financial services and consulting organizations including KPMG/Bearing Point... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks C

11:00am

A Platform for Provisioning Integrated Data and Visualization Capabilities

Analysts at Sandia National Laboratories who have been tasked with answering strategic questions posed by executives, program managers, and sponsors typically perform data analysis studies. However, the challenges of data provisioning for these studies—data collection, integration, quality, and other considerations—are complex and time-consuming, limiting the number of studies performed (and therefore questions asked) at any given time, as well as making the studies long, drawn-out affairs. When the analysts provide answers, the data they used is no longer current, and the results represent a look back at a point in time, resulting in significant additional effort to “refresh” the results.

Sandia’s response to this problem was to architect and build a platform that we called “Analytics for Sandia Knowledge.” This platform utilizes a set of tools, techniques, and custom web applications to create a centralized, integrated, and virtual data repository designed for data analysis and visualization. This platform has significantly reduced Sandia’s “time-to-answer” for data studies, allows more data studies to occur, supports security and privacy needs, and allows us to create sustainable and up-to-date visualizations of data study results. The architecture can support both traditional and Big Data approaches and lays a foundation that is scalable, extendable, and adaptable.

This experience report will provide an overview of the architecture goals, quality attributes, final design, and some lessons learned along the way in creating the virtual data repository and data visualization platform.

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Presenters
avatar for Gerry Giese

Gerry Giese

Sandia National Laboratories
Gerry Giese is a Principal Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories, specializing in information systems, software, and enterprise architectures. Giese is currently Chief Architect for Analytics for Sandia Knowledge, a multiyear corporate milestone project to enable timely, informed, and integrated decisions using data from across the laboratory. His recent work focuses on data management systems to better enable data... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am
Fairbanks A

11:00am

A Quality Attributes Guide for Space Flight Software Architects

In the international standards for architecture descriptions in systems and software engineering (ISO/IEC/IEEE 42010), “concern” is a primary concept that often manifests itself in relation to the quality attributes or “ilities” that a system is expected to exhibit—qualities such as reliability, security, and modifiability. One of the main uses of an architecture description is to serve as a basis for analyzing how well the architecture achieves its quality attributes, and that requires architects to be as precise as possible about what they mean in claiming, for example, that an architecture supports “modifiability.” This presentation describes a table, generated by NASA’s Software Architecture Review Board, that lists 14 key quality attributes, identifies important aspects of each quality attribute, and considers each aspect in terms of requirements, rationale, evidence, and tactics to achieve the aspect. This quality attribute table is intended to serve as a guide to software architects, software developers, and software architecture reviewers in the domain of mission-critical, real-time embedded systems, such as space mission flight software.

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Presenters
avatar for Daniel Dvorak

Daniel Dvorak

Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology
Dan Dvorak is a Principal Engineer in JPL’s Engineering Development Office, where he supports an institutional initiative on Integrated Model-Centric Engineering and co-leads NASA’s Software Architecture Review Board. His interests include model-based systems engineering, software control architectures for robotic systems, and fault management. Dan joined JPL in 1996 after a career at Bell Laboratories. He holds a PhD in Computer... Read More →
avatar for Lorraine Fesq

Lorraine Fesq

Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology
Lorraine Fesq is the Chief Technologist for the Systems Engineering and Formulation Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology. She leads NASA’s Fault Management Community of Practice and co-leads the NASA Software Architecture Review Board. She recently spearheaded the development of the NASA Fault Management Handbook. Lorraine has contributed to over a dozen spacecraft projects and held a teaching and... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 11:00am - 11:30am
Fairbanks B

11:30am

An Inverse Evaluation of Netflix Architecture Using ATAM

Netflix is the biggest internet business in the United States. At peak hours, its downstream bandwidth usage climbs to nearly 37% of internet traffic. Netflix’s success is based on modern, efficient, and robust technologies, frameworks, and architectural concepts. Should we follow its lead and refactor our systems into microservices, split up big databases, and introduce reactive programming, or should we use polyglot approaches?

To answer these questions, we conducted an architecture evaluation based on the well-known Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM). Only this time we applied it in an inverse manner. Starting with the observable architectural approaches, we extracted those requirements and quality attributes that would provide a perfect fit. We reverse-engineered a utility tree and extracted important architecture tradeoffs.

Our findings give a good understanding of the pros and cons of current technological trends and hint on their applicability in different contexts. In addition, they demonstrate the opportunities that evaluation methods like ATAM offer. Applying the ATAM to a real-life system that almost everybody is familiar with leads to comprehensible conclusions and vivid practical insight.

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Presenters
avatar for Stefan Toth

Stefan Toth

embarc Software Consulting GmbH
Stefan Toth is a software architect and CEO of embarc Software Consulting GmbH, based in Hamburg, Germany. His focus lies in the conception and design of medium-sized to big software solutions, the evaluation of software architectures, and the connection of these disciplines to Agile practices. He is a regular speaker at technical conferences and a published book author.


Thursday May 5, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks B

11:30am

Evolution of a Data-Streaming Solution

In this talk, we will describe a business need for data collection and streaming that led to implementation of a data-streaming solution for delivering messages from many clients to various end points including Kafka, HDFS, Mongo DB, and Splunk. The talk will walk attendees through the evolution of the solution from local use of Active MQ and relational databases to a real-time data-streaming solution: Pivotal’s Spring Extreme Data (XD).

We will cover scalability considerations, observed performance, and security considerations. We will describe why the tool was selected, the various solution patterns implemented and discarded, and the final solution topology. We will also discuss deployment considerations for the public cloud, including the secure transport of data between data centers.

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Presenters
avatar for Joseph Paulchell

Joseph Paulchell

Director, Software Engineer, Capital One
I am currently working on data streaming solutions to enable our Big Data strategy, primarily using Spring Extreme Data to send data to Kafka, Hadoop, Mongo, and ELK stacks. I am investing heavily in Amazon Web Services and working toward certification as an architect to better understand how to leverage AWS capabilities like Kinesis, Redshift, S3, and Elastic Search, and others. On the side I am learning Chef, ruby, and Go. | | If you're... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Fairbanks A

1:00pm

U.S. Air Force Software Engineering Efficiency and Productivity for Information Operations

The U.S. Air Force has expanded its software divisions more than any other area consistently since the 1980s. The current Air Force policy through the Air Force Sustainment Center Way doctrine dictates that the efficiency and productivity of software development and maintenance are the factors of highest importance. Unfortunately, it remains difficult to evaluate with accuracy any metrics for the efficiency and productivity of these efforts. Furthermore, due to the evolving nature of the information environment, large-scale and small-scale programs have a hard time with sustainability.

In this presentation, an example program is analyzed for sustainability based on its lifecycle as it progressed through the Air Force’s process of being developed and maintained over a full year. The metrics and process follow the Software Engineering Institute’s Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) and Agile software development. By using both development tools together, the performance factors of efficiency and productivity achieved much better results. Using data collected throughout the program’s lifecycle, this presentation shows which metrics yielded the best feedback for optimizing the process for the program. Statistical analysis of these metrics gives a deep dive into how the implementation of both CMMI and Agile work well for organizations like the Air Force to produce very adaptive, cost-effective software rapidly and with maximum efficiency and productivity.

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Presenters
avatar for Paul Braden

Paul Braden

U.S. Air Force
Paul Braden is an electronics engineer with the U.S. Air Force in the Joint Information Operations Warfare Center at Joint Base San Antonio Lackland. He has been involved in software development and maintenance for several weapon systems, including the B-52, B-1, B-2, C-17, C-5, C-130, and KC-135. In this capacity, he has been trained in the Agile and CMMI methodologies as they apply to the U.S. Air Force and has worked on using these tools for... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Fairbanks C

1:00pm

Office Hours
Thursday May 5, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks D

1:00pm

Discover Quality Requirements with the Mini-QAW

Good quality requirements help you make the right architectural decisions, but collecting your requirements is not always easy. The Quality Attribute Workshop helps teams effectively gather requirements but can be costly and cumbersome to organize. The mini-QAW is a short (a few hours to a full day) workshop designed for inexperienced facilitators and a great fit for teams practicing Agile methods. Variants of the mini-QAW exist for both face-to-face and remote collaboration. The mini-QAW method has been used successfully by several groups throughout the world and is finding its place as a standard tool among many software architects.

During this session, we will walk participants through a mini-QAW simulation. Participants will learn about and apply some of the core mini-QAW activities, including scenario brainstorming with a “system properties web,” creating stakeholder empathy maps, and visual voting. The mini-QAW combines these activities with a tuned agenda (compared to the traditional QAW) to create a fast, effective, and fun workshop that many teams can easily adopt and succeed with. By the end of the session, participants will have gained first-hand experience facilitating and participating in the workshop that will let them use the method with their teams back home.

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Presenters
avatar for Will Chaparro

Will Chaparro

IBM
Will Chaparro is a senior managing consultant in the Watson Group at IBM who has spent over 5 years designing and building complex enterprise search solutions for organizations. Before his current role, he spent 11 years as a software engineer, designing and implementing highly scalable audio-conferencing solutions for Compunetix, Inc. He has a BS in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh.
avatar for Thijmen de Gooijer

Thijmen de Gooijer

Architect, ABB Corporate Research
Thijmen De Gooijer works at ABB Corporate Research Sweden in a team of software architects and user-experience researchers, where he collaborates with colleagues in Europe, India, and the United States on applied research projects. Outside the lab, he supports ABB’s businesses to answer enterprise and software architecture questions. Thijmen graduated cum laude in software engineering with a double MSc from VU University in Amsterdam (The... Read More →
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Software Engineer, Watson Group, IBM
Michael Keeling is a senior software engineer at IBM, where he develops and maintains IBM’s Watson Explorer and Watson platforms. Michael is an experienced software architect, Agile practitioner, and programmer, having worked on projects ranging from combat systems to search to web apps. He holds a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks B

1:00pm

MarshmalloWars: A Gamification Experience

Gamification is a management technique that is growing and having great success. It brings motivation, engagement, and really quick results. Come with us, learn something about the concepts behind the methodology, and see how a software development team discovered this practice and used it in a great variety of problems and scenarios. And almost succumbed to the dark side ...

Through the games, we can achieve unbelievable results, but sometimes individuals also turn to the dark side. After all, we are interacting with the passions of the people. This session covers the following topics:

  • What worked and what didn’t?
  • How does gamification work?
  • How can we identify the scenarios where the gamification will provide the best solution?
  • What types of games can we use?

Also in this session, we invite you to experience gamification in practice and play a funny and engaging game. Learn and feel the power of the Force.

Are you prepared?

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Presenters
avatar for Juliano Ribeiro

Juliano Ribeiro

Objective Solutions
Juliano Ribeiro has developed software professionally since 1994. He led development teams for several years and implemented a number of practices from XP, Kanban, and Scrum in companies where he worked. He is a developer, consultant, teacher, speaker, and father. He hold the certifications CSM, CSP (SA), and CDD (Embarcadero). Juliano has organized editions of the Agile Tour in Brazil and lectured in many cities and events both inside and... Read More →
avatar for Marcelo Luis Walter

Marcelo Luis Walter

Objective Solutions
Marcelo Luis Walter is an Agile enthusiast, working with software development for more than two decades. Focused on high quality, simplicity, and “evolution without fear,” he has expertise in leading teams using XP, Scrum, and Kanban. His efforts are to disseminate the Agile principles through Brazil. As coach of a development team at Objective Solutions, he and the team had experienced a great and successful case. Step by step... Read More →



Thursday May 5, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks A

1:30pm

The Journey to Hybrid Cloud: Considerations for Architecting Your Enterprise Roadmap

Private clouds have gotten much recent attention, with the enterprise becoming talented in single application hosting for a seamless experience. But what about the holistic enterprise? A recent Gartner report found that by 2016, cloud computing will become the bulk of new IT spending; by the end of 2017, nearly half of large enterprises will have hybrid cloud deployments. The journey starts with asking “Why” and defining the vision instead of the mechanics. By identifying the imperatives and underlying drivers, architects can determine how to measure the value of cloud integration. While there is no single formula for cloud adoption, creating a successful hybrid cloud involves strategic and tactical considerations that reach beyond IT to meet the overall business vision.

In this session, hear lessons learned from an international consultancy with experience across multiple business sectors. Leading practices include the following:

  • Are we ready? Identify key areas in which to explore your maturity and transitional readiness.
  • Which of our architectural landscapes are affected?
  1. Data landscape: Explore performance, security, and legal and regulatory ramifications based on where data resides and how it is accessed.
  2. Processing landscape: Where do various types of compute execute? How do location, virtualization strategy, and capacity/elastic compute availability impact latency and the solution architectural design?
  3. Security landscape: Holistic security includes aspects such as authentication, authorization, encryption, and protections for data in motion, at rest, and in use.
  4. Operations and monitoring landscape: How is holistic platform monitoring achieved given distributed responsibilities and service-level agreements?

Presenters
avatar for Tracy Bannon

Tracy Bannon

Deloitte Consulting LLP
Tracy Bannon is a Specialist Leader with Deloitte Consulting’s Technology practice and has over 24 years’ experience in Solution and Enterprise Architecture. Her experience crosses multiple technologies and platforms. Her ability to communicate advanced technical topics to both stakeholders and technicians has made her a sought-after technical leader. She also holds Microsoft certifications; is PMP and CSM certified; has been a... Read More →
avatar for Sebnem Tokcan

Sebnem Tokcan

Deloitte Consulting LLP
Sebnem Tokcan is an engineer and a manager in Deloitte Consulting technology practice. She joined Deloitte in 2015 with more than 15 years of information technology experience. She has held a variety of leadership positions, including managing a Virtualization Practice to deliver ITaaS, IaaS, and Cloud Advisory Services for large financial institutions, government entities, health care, and energy institutions through multiple infrastructure... Read More →
avatar for Jacques de Villiers

Jacques de Villiers

Deloitte Consulting LLP
Jacques de Villiers is Director of Deloitte Consulting LLP. He joined Deloitte in 2015 with a focus on the adoption of cloud technology to better improve business performance across the health-care, technology, and manufacturing industries. Jacques is highly regarded for his client-service excellence and committed to delivering the insights that clients need to address their most critical and complex business challenges. Jacques has held a wide... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Fairbanks C

2:00pm

UPDATE Your VIEW on DELETE: The Benefits of Event Sourcing

With Event Sourcing, there is an alternative way to build web applications that is simple, scalable, extensible, and elegant without an object-relational map (ORM) anywhere in sight. As a bonus, we even get a free time machine.

Event Sourcing is a very old way of thinking about modeling—other industries have used it for centuries. Rather than modeling the current state of an object, we model the events that have changed it and derive the current state from the events. A canonical example is that the current state of your bank account balance is simply a calculation of all the debits and credits that have happened to the account.

This talk will explain what Event Sourcing is, how it differs from ORMs, and why you should consider using it. You will hear about practical examples that highlight differences and how you can incrementally move in this new direction.

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Presenters
avatar for Sebastian von Conrad

Sebastian von Conrad

Envato
Sebastian von Conrad heads the software architecture efforts at Envato, which operates very large-scale websites. He loves helping to solve difficult technical problems at scale. He is a former development manager and developer, and he is the previous President of Ruby Australia. Growing up in Sweden, Australia was about the last place Sebastian ever thought he’d visit, yet alone live. After 7 years and counting, however, he has no plans of... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Fairbanks C

3:00pm

Linda Northrop Architecture Award Keynote: Reflections on Software Architecture

Software architecture has enormous influence on the behavior of a system. For many categories of systems, early architectural decisions can have a greater influence on success than nearly any other factor. After more than 20 years of research and practice, the foundations for software architecture have been established and codified, but challenges remain. Among other trends, increased connectivity, a shift to the cloud and to mobile platforms, and increased operational and market tempos have precipitated the need for changes in architectural practices and decisions. This talk shares a perspective on the history of software architecture, trends influencing the need for change and the related architectural challenges, and some applicable research and practices.

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Presenters
avatar for Linda Northrop

Linda Northrop

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Linda Northrop has 45 years of experience in the software development field as a practitioner, researcher, manager, consultant, author, speaker, and educator. She is a Fellow at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) where she is currently a part-time employee working for the CTO on strategic technical activities. During her tenure at the SEI, she held a number of leadership positions, collaborated with academic and... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

4:00pm

Presentation by the Winner of the First Linda Northrop Architecture Award: Adapting Architecture Practices to Changing Times—From What to Why and Back Again

In 1996, Mary Shaw and David Garlan effectively established software architecture as a systematic discipline to reason about software at a higher level of abstraction. Less than a decade later, the architecture discipline came under severe attack by the Agile movement. In the first decade of the millennium, many perceived up-front design as wasteful and obstructing agility. Before answering questions about what makes a good architecture, architects were forced to consider why architecture was needed in the first place. The answer emerged (like many good architectures) in the years that followed. It became clear that under some conditions, developing software without proper architecture can be very risky and costly. Nowadays, the relationships among risk, cost, and architecture are firmly established.  Architecture is needed to manage risk and cost associated with complex systems, answering the why question and giving a basis for new answers to the how and what of architecture practice. At CGI, we collected these answers in our Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture (RCDA) approach. This talk is about how we did this, the results we observed, and the challenges ahead.

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Presenters
avatar for Eltjo Poort

Eltjo Poort

CGI
Eltjo R. Poort is a Distinguished Solution Architect at CGI in The Netherlands. In his 30-year career in the software industry, he has fulfilled many engineering and project management roles. In the 1990s, he oversaw the implementation of the first SMS text messaging systems in the United States. In the last decade, he published work on improving architecting practices, including his PhD thesis in 2012. Eltjo is best known for his work on Risk... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

4:30pm

Conference Awards, SATURN 2017 Announcements, and Closing Remarks
Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE Software have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of architecture-centric practices. The IEEE Software SATURN New Directions Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes innovative new approaches and thought leadership in the application of architecture-centric practices.

Presenters
avatar for Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Ipek Ozkaya is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the SEI and deputy lead of the Architecture Practices Initiative. She develops effective methods for improving software development and system evolution by emphasizing software architecture practices, software economics, and agile development. Her recent research focuses on managing technical debt in large-scale, software-intensive systems. Ozkaya serves as chair of the advisory board... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

6:00pm