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  • Registration is open every day from 7:30 a.m. until the close of the day’s sessions. 
  • 30-minute refreshment breaks are at 10:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. daily (Wednesday afternoon break is at 2:00 p.m.). 
  • Lunch is 12:00-1:00 p.m. daily in the Catalina Ballroom (Monday lunch is in the Shutters Hospitality Suite)

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Plenary Sessions [clear filter]
Tuesday, May 3
 

8:30am

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Presenters
avatar for Amine Chigani

Amine Chigani

GE Digital
Amine Chigani is a Principal Architect at GE Digital. His work focuses on building Industrial IoT solutions on the Predix™ Platform for GE businesses and their customers. He’s equally passionate about the software he builds and about how architecture is employed in building such... Read More →
avatar for Bill Pollak

Bill Pollak

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Leading Advisor, Statoil ASA
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong interest in open source, internet technology, and programming languages. He currently is data and solution architect at Statoil, focusing on software architecture and systems integration challenges. Statoil ASA is the... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom

9:00am

Keynote: Architecting the Unknown

There are many systems that we know how to architect (usually because we've built them many times before). There also many systems for which we know a process that will lead us to a reasonable architecture (usually because the forces on our project permit incremental and iterative development). There are even some things we know how not to architect (because we've tried before). However, there are some systems for which we hardly know where to begin (because not only are they wickedly hard, they are also far beyond our current art and science). These are the classes of systems that most interest me: how do we architect the unknown? In this presentation, we'll start by laying a foundation of what we know we know about software architecture, and then we'll consider what we know we don't know. Following that, we'll take a leap into the unknown and look at the kinds of systems that will stretch us both technically, socially, and ethically.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.

See an artist's rendering.


Presenters
avatar for Grady Booch

Grady Booch

IBM Research
Grady Booch is Chief Scientist for Software Engineering as well as Chief Scientist for Watson/M at IBM Research. Having originated the term and the practice of object-oriented design, he is best known for his work in advancing the fields of software engineering and software architecture... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom
 
Wednesday, May 4
 

8:30am

Morning Remarks
Presenters
avatar for Amine Chigani

Amine Chigani

GE Digital
Amine Chigani is a Principal Architect at GE Digital. His work focuses on building Industrial IoT solutions on the Predix™ Platform for GE businesses and their customers. He’s equally passionate about the software he builds and about how architecture is employed in building such... Read More →
avatar for Bill Pollak

Bill Pollak

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
avatar for Jørn Ølmheim

Jørn Ølmheim

Leading Advisor, Statoil ASA
Jørn Ølmheim is a practicing software professional with strong interest in open source, internet technology, and programming languages. He currently is data and solution architect at Statoil, focusing on software architecture and systems integration challenges. Statoil ASA is the... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom

9:00am

Keynote: Rethinking Software Design

The essence of design is structure: What parts comprise the whole and how are they related? In the field of software, we have ways to structure implementation—with functions and datatypes, design patterns, architectures, and so on—but we lack a way to structure behavior. Witness the way we sometimes talk of having “thousands of requirements,” although a requirement is usually little more than a transition in a state machine.

To make software that is more usable and more robust, we need a way to structure behavior. Just as architects design the structure of a building in terms of light and space and flow, leaving to engineers the task of designing the physical structures that will support their visions, so we need software architects who can shape software independently of its realization.

In this talk, I'll present the elements of a new theory of software design that provides a structuring principle for behavior, criteria for identifying good and bad structures, and patterns to emulate. I'll also report on our experience applying the theory on a variety of systems.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.

See an artist's rendering.


Presenters
avatar for Daniel Jackson

Daniel Jackson

MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Daniel Jackson is Professor of Computer Science at MIT, a MacVicar teaching fellow, and Associate Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT’s largest laboratory. He is the lead designer of the Alloy modeling language and author of Software... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Bel Aire Ballroom

1:00pm

Keynote: Architecture and the Evolution of Complex Systems

The frameworks that formal architectures supply both enable and constrain certain types of design decisions and desired system qualities. Just like laws and cultural conventions, they embody the values and belief systems of people even though it may not always be obvious to the casual user or even to the original architects themselves.

Today the world is in the midst of laying down a communication and decision fabric that will connect trillions of people, objects, and intelligent machines into the most complex cyber-physical system that the world has ever imagined. The emerging Industrial Internet will connect systems that our lives depend on such as power systems, transportation systems, and healthcare networks.

It has been proposed that globalization has made the world "flat," but is the next generation of network and business architectures now destined to make the world "shallow"? Lost in a seemingly endless fog of distractions and short-term weak connections, will the urge to be connected overwhelm our ability to remain cognitive and free individuals? Has "The Medium" changed the message again without our having knowingly approved? As machines increasingly evolve with stronger forms of artificial intelligence and cognitive computing, they will become more human-like. More importantly as we become a collection of networked beings, will we become more machine-like, twitching and tweeting an endless stream of bits, or will we achieve a higher level of awareness and sophistication? What is our destiny?

Clearly it is a matter of architecture. The systems of systems we are building now will alter how we later process critical information, choose to innovate, and interact with man and machine in the future. In this talk, I will examine the formation of the Industrial Internet Consortium and the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute with this in mind and compare them with respect to their stakeholders, business models, and emerging architectures.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Joseph Salvo

Joseph Salvo

GE Global Research and Industrial Internet Consortium
Dr. Salvo is the Director and Founder of the Industrial Internet Consortium, which aims to connect brilliant minds and machines in powerful value-creation networks. For the past 15 years, he and his laboratory have developed a series of large-scale Internet-based sensing arrays to... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

6:00pm

Kids and IoT: An Integrated IoT Educational Platform

The Internet of Things and “Industry 4.0” will profoundly change the world that we live in and the jobs of the future. It only makes sense—as parents, teachers, and software architects—that we make sure to consider how we are preparing the coming generation for these changes and career opportunities. As a tech-savvy parent who is raising two “digital-native” children (ages 14 and 11), I have seen firsthand how this upcoming generation interacts with technology. I have coached Lego Robotics; taught Arduino, introductory Linux, Minecraft server, and modding classes; and tried to get kids engaged in creative programming activities. But until now I haven’t been able to find a teaching architecture that ties it all together with a specific goal and purpose.

This session will discuss my experiences over the past six years as a parent-teacher of technology to this digital-native generation and will present, with live demos and live digital natives (kids), an IoT teaching platform based on Chromebooks, Linux, NodeJS, Arduinos, Raspberry Pi, NodeMCU, MQTT, Minecraft, Unity, and Node-Red.


Presenters
avatar for Kent Meyer

Kent Meyer

Emcraft Systems
Kent Meyer has been in the technology industry for 34 years, working at a compiler company and a real-time operating system company as well as founding a telecommunications infrastructure company and founding and directing a hardware ARM/Linux system-on-module company. It’s been... Read More →


Wednesday May 4, 2016 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Catalina Ballroom
 
Thursday, May 5
 

3:00pm

Linda Northrop Architecture Award Keynote: Reflections on Software Architecture

Software architecture has enormous influence on the behavior of a system. For many categories of systems, early architectural decisions can have a greater influence on success than nearly any other factor. After more than 20 years of research and practice, the foundations for software architecture have been established and codified, but challenges remain. Among other trends, increased connectivity, a shift to the cloud and to mobile platforms, and increased operational and market tempos have precipitated the need for changes in architectural practices and decisions. This talk shares a perspective on the history of software architecture, trends influencing the need for change and the related architectural challenges, and some applicable research and practices.

Get the slides.

Watch the video.


Presenters
avatar for Linda Northrop

Linda Northrop

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Linda Northrop has 45 years of experience in the software development field as a practitioner, researcher, manager, consultant, author, speaker, and educator. She is a Fellow at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) where she is currently a part-time... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

4:00pm

Presentation by the Winner of the First Linda Northrop Architecture Award: Adapting Architecture Practices to Changing Times—From What to Why and Back Again

In 1996, Mary Shaw and David Garlan effectively established software architecture as a systematic discipline to reason about software at a higher level of abstraction. Less than a decade later, the architecture discipline came under severe attack by the Agile movement. In the first decade of the millennium, many perceived up-front design as wasteful and obstructing agility. Before answering questions about what makes a good architecture, architects were forced to consider why architecture was needed in the first place. The answer emerged (like many good architectures) in the years that followed. It became clear that under some conditions, developing software without proper architecture can be very risky and costly. Nowadays, the relationships among risk, cost, and architecture are firmly established.  Architecture is needed to manage risk and cost associated with complex systems, answering the why question and giving a basis for new answers to the how and what of architecture practice. At CGI, we collected these answers in our Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture (RCDA) approach. This talk is about how we did this, the results we observed, and the challenges ahead.

Get the slides.


Presenters
avatar for Eltjo Poort

Eltjo Poort

CGI
Eltjo R. Poort is a Distinguished Solution Architect at CGI in The Netherlands. In his 30-year career in the software industry, he has fulfilled many engineering and project management roles. In the 1990s, he oversaw the implementation of the first SMS text messaging systems in the... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Bel Aire Ballroom

4:30pm

Conference Awards, SATURN 2017 Announcements, and Closing Remarks
Since 2010, the SEI and IEEE Software have been conferring two attendee-selected awards at SATURN. The IEEE Software SATURN Architecture in Practice Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes experiences, methods, and lessons learned from the implementation of architecture-centric practices. The IEEE Software SATURN New Directions Presentation Award is given to the presentation that best describes innovative new approaches and thought leadership in the application of architecture-centric practices.

Presenters
avatar for Ipek Ozkaya

Ipek Ozkaya

Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Ipek Ozkaya is a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at the SEI and deputy lead of the Architecture Practices Initiative. She develops effective methods for improving software development and system evolution by emphasizing software architecture practices, software economics... Read More →


Thursday May 5, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Bel Aire Ballroom